Returners: Our Workforce Needs You

 

If you are currently out of work, at home or on an extended career break – and you are feeling intimidated at the prospect of returning to work or your career, then this event is for you.

I invite you to meet some of our country’s brightest and inspiring experts: You will garner important information on how to prepare yourself for this, sometimes daunting, step.

Speakers include:

Margot Slattery, Country President, Sodexo Ireland – Describing herself as a ‘worker’, Margot has quietly championed inclusion and equality in the workplace and made Sodexo an industry leader in, their term, ‘quality of life services’ – Leading the way in new and flexible work practices.

Emer Kirk, Head of Development and Marketing, Harvest Financial – Emer specialises in the area of advice on pensions and retirement planning. She is an associate of the Institute of Taxation and co-founder of Connect Women in Pensions, a network that supoprts the importance of retirement planning for women.

Elaine Russell, Head of Women Returners in Ireland. Having spent over 20 years leading commercial teams in large multinationals. Elaine specialises in career coaching and supports women to rebuild their professional confidence, play to their strengths and successfully integrate work into their lives.

Our panel also includes industry experts in higher education, retraining, upskilling as well as actual returners, who have successfully navigated their way back to work.

Tickets for the event are free but limited, so please take a moment to book your place asap. Tickets can be booked here

Please share the event with any friends and family you think might benefit from attending.

Best,

Mary Mitchell O’Connor TD
Minister of State for Higher Education

 

Opening Address: Trinity College Dublin – THE NEW ACADEMIC TRACK FOR INTERNSHIPS

Minister Mary Mitchell O’Connor being greeted by the Provost Dr. Prendergast, Prof Hennessy and Prof Gill at the launch of the National Academic Track for Internship, TCD, Dublin. Photo: David Coleman

Distinguished Academics and HSE representatives. And to the new head of the Trinity School of Medicine, Prof Michael Gill.

I am truly delighted to be invited here this morning, to meet with you all as you embark on one of the most exciting developments in Irish medicine and innovation. And especially on the morning that this esteemed campus is named as one of the most beautiful on the planet! Congratulations!

As a mother, having lived, first hand, through the blood, sweat, tears and commitment that a trainee doctor needs to apply to their medical qualification I commend you all on your huge achievement – Being selected as the inaugural group of 24 junior doctors to undertake the first of its kind in Ireland, The Academic Track for Internship.

I know you started your programme in July and I hope you have settled in and are relishing the challenge that lies in front of you. This is the first step on your career path from academic intern to a consultant clinician scientist. Exciting.

On reading some of your testimonials where you recount your areas of research, I was inspired and heartened that the future of our healthcare system will benefit from your innovations and the discoveries your research will bring.

As the first class of the The Academic Track for Internship, it was inspiring to read that approximately a third of you expressed an interest in undertaking the innovative pathway. You will lead the charge in enabling Ireland to remain one of the top innovation nations in the world.

It is a great opportunity for all of you to gain valuable experience in either clinical research, further medical education or in leadership and healthcare management.

You, as the chosen 24 interns, will make valuable connections with clinical researchers, academic and healthcare leaders that might not have otherwise happened until much later in your career.

I am sure many of you would have sought our similar programmes in the UK or further afield, so I am delighted as the Minister for State with responsibility for Higher Education to be able to facilitate your academic career in Ireland. Retaining medical talent in Ireland helps us address the skills shortage in academic medicine. 

As you are aware, Health Research is critical in providing essential information to government and policymakers. Health research is an investment in our future and it ensures a better health system and a better health outcomes.

Health research provides us with the evidence to address key societal challenges – such as an ageing population and the increases in chronic diseases. Research activity attracts and retains high-quality health professionals in the system. With global shortages in all areas of medicine and patient care, we need a vibrant research-active system to attract and retain skilled personnel.

The HSE is investing €250,000 in this programme. NDTP hopes that the availability of the academic track internships in Ireland will contribute to the retention of medical graduates of Irish medical schools who have academic as well as clinical ambitions. Furthermore, this initiative provides an early and dedicated focus on research skills among doctors.

I sincerely hope that many of you will go on to undertake further and more sizeable academic research during your careers and work as academic clinicians and that we all will be reading about you and your medical advancements in the years to come.

Brexit is set to have a significant impact on higher education in Ireland and the long term effects of it on the research landscape both in Europe and Ireland are not yet clear. Every year a considerable number of Irish medical students leave the country on graduation.

I see this development within the School of Medicine in Trinity College Dublin as an advancement to mitigate against any negative effects of Brexit and undoubtedly will strengthen the opportunities for Medicine undergraduates and postgraduates.

It is imperative that the Government does everything within its power to ensure opportunities exist for our future academic clinicians that keeps Ireland at the forefront of medical innovations.

I believe the future of clinical research in the country will be in safe hands, your hands. Programmes such as this are the perfect way to harness your exceptional abilities to benefit all our inhabitants. I have no doubt that patients both here in Ireland, and globally will thank you for your dedication in years to come.

I want to reiterate Prof Martina Hennessey’s remark, you are the stars. Go forth and shine in the field of medicine. I wish you every success during your internship and look forward to hearing and reading about you in the future.

Thank you.

HSE review of autism services open for submissions

ASD affects many adults and children across the constituency. I want to encourage people with autism spectrum disorder, parents and clinicians to make submissions to a HSE review of autism supports and services. I want to ensure that people with ASD in Dun Laoghaire have access to the necessary supports to enable them to reach their full potential and live rich and fulfilling lives.

I recognise the need for a strategic approach to enhancing the responsiveness and effectiveness of local services to meet the evolving needs of people with ASD.

Following feedback from the constituency, I have been in constant communication with my Cabinet colleague, Minister for Health Simon Harris, highlighting the need for such a review. The HSE has set up a working group to consider the effectiveness of existing services, to identify models of good practice among such services and to identify practice models that are not having a positive impact.

It is important that we identify where in the country services are operating well and where they are not. The HSE has now invited submissions from service users, parents and practitioners and I want to encourage people to take the opportunity to have their voices heard.

“Three workshops will also be held in September with key advocates and NGOs: Disability Federation of Ireland; the National Federation of Voluntary Bodies and Inclusion Ireland and the working group will report on its findings by the end of September.

The Department of Health will initiate an epidemiological research study into the prevalence and future projections for autism spectrum disorder later this year to allow us to plan for the future and future-proof our strategies for people with autism.

Following the advancement of this work, the Minister has told me he intends to proceed next year with a national strategy for enhancing the health service response to people with ASD.

Further information on the review, including how to make your submission, can be found here 

The closing date for submissions is 12 September 2017.

€4 million Capital Fund announced for Community Youth Groups

There is good news for community youth groups today following the announcement of the establishment of a €4 million capital fund which will be made available to volunteer led youth groups, to allow them to purchase equipment that will support their work in the community

Volunteer led youth groups are at the heart of every town and village in Ireland. Up and down the country there are groups bringing sport, theatre and arts, music, adventure, technology and so many other activities to the young people of their community. It is important that these are recognised and that funding is made available to support the equipment needs of such clubs.

As a parent, former teacher and Principal, I know how many children across Dun Laoghaire have benefitted from access to activities through community youth groups. We cannot underestimate the importance of these groups in a child’s development, mentally, physically and socially.

I welcome the news that this funding is to be made available and encourage volunteer led youth groups, across the constituency, who are in need of equipment to apply. Over 1,500 clubs across the country will be eligible to apply for this funding. The application process is expected to open in late September and I will share further details as they become available.

Over €183,600 Extra Funding for Childcare Services in Dún Laoghaire Rathdown

Childcare services in Dún Laoghaire Rathdown are to receive €183,653.26 in extra funding, Fine Gael Minister of State for Higher Education, Mary Mitchell O’Connor, has said.

The financial boost comes at a key moment in Ireland’s move to accessible affordable quality childcare.

Minister Mitchell O’Connor said: “I am delighted to announce that local childcare services will receive over €183,600 in extra funding.

“The money will be used to provide more than new childcare places, maintenance and building work as well as outdoor play areas and is available for immediate draw-down by providers across Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County.

“A total of 17 grants have been made to providers in Dún Laoghaire Rathdown across three strands of funding. Some of these are to individual facilities and providers, others are to larger companies with multiple facilities across the County.

“I hold the provision of quality, affordable and accessible childcare as a very highest priority, ensuring local children get the very best start in life. As a former teacher, and as a mother and grandmother, I know how important the foundations to education that are laid in a child’s early years are.

“My Government colleague, Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Dr Katherine Zappone, said €8.4m in capital funding has been allocated through the Department of Children and Youth Affairs to 683 pre-school providers nationwide; an increase in €4,4m on the amount announced for this programme in March 2017.

“This funding will benefit children, families and providers under our Early Years programmes, and will contribute to the development of an infrastructure that is ready to meet the radical new approach to subsidising childcare outlined in Budget 2017.

“Since first entering Government, Fine Gael has prioritised hard pressed working families; the people who bore the brunt of the economic recession. A major part of this has been to reduce the cost of childcare for working parents.

“We introduced the free pre-school year, and subsequently extended it to a second year. It is estimated the extended scheme provides an average saving of €4,000 per child.

“We also recently introduced paternity leave for the first time ever. Dads are now entitled to two weeks’ paid leave.
“From September an estimated 70,000 children nationwide will get extra supports. This will really benefit families in Dún Laoghaire Rathdown.

“Families will benefit in two ways. First there is a universal support for all children aged 3 and under then there are supports for those families who need it most.

“The second targeted support is based on income and also for those parents who have had to turn down jobs, training and education because they cannot afford childcare.

“I encourage parents in Dún Laoghaire Rathdown to take the time to study the increased supports which are available and prepare for the autumn, by checking out the new website www.affordablechildcare.ie or by talking to staff at your local childcare centre.

Speech at the opening of the 2017 Summer School in Celtic Studies

  A dhaoine uaisle. Tá an-áthas orm a bheith anseo inniu le Scoil Shamhraidh na hInsitiúide Ard Léinn a oscailt go foirmeálta. Cuireann sé gliondar orm daoine as gach cearn den domhan a fheiceáil cruinnithe anseo i lárionad domhanda an Léinn Cheiltigh lena gcuid eolais ar an ábhar seo a leathnú agus le blaiseadh de shaol agus de chultúr na hÉireann. Continue reading

Minister Mitchell O’Connor welcomes strong improvement in Ireland’s competitiveness performance

The Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor T.D., today (Thursday June 1st) welcomed the findings of the IMD’s 2017 Global Competitiveness Yearbook which shows that Ireland’s competitiveness ranking has improved by one place this year and Ireland is now the 6th most competitive economy as benchmarked by the IMD. Within the EU and Euro area Ireland is the second most competitive economy. This is Ireland’s best competitiveness ranking as benchmarked by the IMD, since 2000. Continue reading

Knowledge Development Box (Certification of Inventions) Act 2017 comes into force and now extends to SMEs

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor has announced the commencement of an Act for a certification scheme aimed at inventions developed by SMEs. The scheme comes within the Knowledge Development Box initiative announced in the Finance Act, 2015.

Announcing the scheme the Minister said “this is a good day for innovative SMEs involved in research and development that results in valuable Intellectual Property (IP) assets”.

Under the scheme, SMEs can apply to the Controller of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks for a certificate where they believe that their IP generated as a result of R&D is novel, non-obvious and useful. If granted, the certificate will allow the SME to apply the lower rate of corporation tax of 6.25% to profits arising from the intellectual property assets.

Evidence shows that investment in R&D increases economic productivity and fosters competitiveness and that firms with a persistent R&D strategy outperform those with an irregular or no R&D investment program.

Welcoming the scheme the Minister said “R&D can be very expensive and time consuming and not all R&D is successful. SMEs that invest in R&D will now be able to benefit from the lower rate of corporation tax if their IP meets the criteria of being novel, non-obvious and useful. I expect that the extension of the KDB to Irish SMEs will incentivise greater levels of R&D within the indigenous sector and that with greater levels of R&D, increased job creation will follow which is a key priority of mine.”

Welcoming the scheme, the Minister for Employment and Small Business, Mr Pat Breen TD, said “it places SMEs on a par with larger companies by making them for eligible for a lower rate of corporation tax on profits from their IP assets. I welcome this additional support and anticipate that it will encourage our indigenous SMEs to be more creative.

The Minister for Training, Skills and Innovation, John Halligan TD, said “Promoting innovation is a key focus for me in my role as Minister for Innovation and I believe this Act offers SMEs valuable opportunities to invest in greater levels of R&D”.

Pitney Bowes Invests in Dublin Creating 100 Jobs

Pitney Bowes Inc., a global technology company, has today announced plans to open a new Operations Centre in Dublin that will house a three-year multi-million euro R&D project focused on developing a next generation e-commerce and payments platform for global brands.

The new Operations Centre will comprise a Client Support Centre and Research & Design Centre, creating approximately 100 new jobs for technical support, customer support and e-commerce R&D professionals in the region over the next few years.

As global commerce continues to grow, the platform being developed at the Research & Design Centre in Dublin will create opportunities for merchants to reach consumers around the world and expand into new markets at speed.

The Client Support Centre is part of Pitney Bowes’ global strategy to deliver its clients the best support as more organisations, including 90 per cent of the Fortune 500, rely on its solutions and services to power global commerce. The technical support and customer support professionals will serve clients located in the UK, Ireland and Nordic regions.

Pitney Bowes’ investment in Dublin is supported by the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation through IDA Ireland. Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Mary Mitchell O’Connor said, “I’m delighted that Pitney Bowes are opening a new Operations Centre which will create 100 new jobs and are investing in a high value strategic R&D project. We in Government are working to make Ireland an attractive destination for global technology companies such as Pitney Bowes. Our economy is an open and business friendly one with a minimum of administrative hurdles. We strive to ensure that we have the requisite skills available to meet the needs of industry and this is paying off. I wish Pitney Bowes every success with their Client Support Centre and their R&D project.”

“Dublin’s rich mix of client services talent and language skills, combined with the excellent support that we’ve received from IDA Ireland make it a great place for us to locate our client support operation as well as our innovation team,” said Audrey Lynch, Director of Client Operations for Europe at Pitney Bowes Inc. “Our clients turn to us around the clock to power billions of transactions globally, and ensuring they receive the best account and technical support is a strategic priority for us. This new facility will help us deliver on our promise to clients in the UK, Ireland and Nordics.”

Martin Shanahan, CEO of IDA Ireland said: “Ireland’s diverse multilingual talent pool and pro-business infrastructure make Ireland the ideal destination for companies like Pitney Bowes. I am delighted that they have chosen to establish both a customer support centre and a high value R&D project in Ireland. I wish the company every success and offer the continued support of IDA Ireland in the future.”

Pitney Bowes currently operates in Dublin a Global Ecommerce centre, supporting cross-border retail for many of the world’s most iconic retailers and brands. The new Pitney Bowes Client Support Centre team will be located alongside their Global Ecommerce colleagues in Fitzwilliam Square West, Dublin and builds on the company’s continued investment in the region.

In 2016 Ireland’s economy grew by 5.2 per cent, outstripping all other Eurozone countries and nearly all official forecasts. A growing number of multinational companies are continuing to choose the region as a base for locating either their European hubs or regional customer support facilities.

Clonkeen College

I am vehemently opposed to Christian Brothers’ plan to sell off the majority of the playing fields site at Clonkeen College to a developer.

In the past fortnight, I have met with the School Principal and Deputy Principal to discuss the situation. Following those discussions, I wrote to Brother Garvey and to Minister Bruton seeking a resolution. I have received a response from Brother Garvey and have passed that on to the Chairman of the Board of Management. I also requested a meeting with Brother Garvey but he has yet to respond to that request. This morning, along with Cllr. Patricia Stewart and my Special Adviser, I met with members of the Board of Management and advised them that they should urgently seek legal representation.

Clonkeen College has a long history of using these fields and, under the principle of promissory estoppel, they have an understanding that they can continue to use this land in this way into the future. There has been significant investment on the site, both on the school building but also the recently concluded drainage, seeding and fencing of the playing fields themselves. This investment needs to be protected.

These playing fields are absolutely irreplaceable in the locality. There are no alternatives; the fields are a significant public amenity as well as being vital to the wellbeing and fitness of the school students, and a key resource for their physical education. The school community and the community of the greater area would be adversely affected if this land was to be sold.

The Christian Brothers justify the sale of the lands by saying the money is needed to make their outstanding payment to redress scheme. Why these lands? Why penalise the children of Clonkeen College, current and future to pay for the sins of members of the Christian Brothers congregation in the past? It is unacceptable.

I will continue to work with the school and the Minister for Education and Skills to explore every avenue to protect these pitches.